See Profiles and Comparisons of Judicial Candidates

Early voting is underway! Judicial races are “down ballot.” What this means is that they are typically at the end of a very long list of items needing voters’ attention. The Texas Civil Justice League is reminding Texans that ballot fatigue is bad for our state — we are urging voters to become educated and to vote all the way through their ballots. Join us and help your circle of influence understand that: Judges are important. They have a direct impact on citizens, perhaps more than any other elected official, because they make decisions that can affect jobs, homes, children and personal freedoms. Voters must take the responsibility to educate themselves about judicial candidates.  And they must vote!  Turnout is important, for both the primaries and the general election. Texans need to elect judges who are fair, impartial and well It’s easy to run as a single-issue candidate, but judges with activist agendas are not good for Texas. Learn about the people on your ballot and vote for the ones who will do a great job for our state. The Texas Civil Justice League (TCJL) is launching a statewide voter education effort to increase awareness about the importance of electing —and re-electing — qualified judges. We need your help.  As Texans, we get to elect our judges. That’s a big responsibility. Help us urge people to do their homework, to go to the polls, and to vote for good people who will make great judges.  See Profiles and Comparisons of Texas appellate judicial candidates here: http://texasjudges.org/compare/ ....
Former Texas Supreme Court Justice Dale Wainwright discusses how a judge can impact a person’s life

Former Texas Supreme Court Justice Dale Wainwright discusses how a judge can impact a person’s life

Judges have the power to decide custody of your children, foreclose on your home or even give a death sentence. That is why it is so important to vote for qualified, knowledgeable and fair judges. Former Texas Supreme Court Justice Dale Wainwright explains how judges can greatly impact a person’s daily life and lists the qualities of a good judicial...
Texas Tribune Analysis: Could Surname Be Key in Republican Supreme Court Race?

Texas Tribune Analysis: Could Surname Be Key in Republican Supreme Court Race?

by Ross Ramsey, The Texas Tribune February 22, 2016 Editor’s note: If you’d like an email notice whenever we publish Ross Ramsey’s column, click here. What’s the deal with Texas Republican primary voters and candidates with Hispanic names? This question comes around every two years — usually as part of an election autopsy exploring why a particular candidate lost. The question describes risk more than it describes certainty: Sometimes, it does not apply at all; sometimes, the difference in names seems to be the only reason for an election to come out the way it did. It’s a risk for Texas Supreme Court Justice Eva Guzman, who finds herself in a Republican primary against Joe Pool Jr. of Dallas, who has unsuccessfully tried to get on the court two times before this year. For one thing, that means he’s been on the state ballot one more time than the incumbent. Guzman was appointed by then-Gov. Rick Perry in 2009 and ran for a full six-year term the next year. She beat Rose Vela by a nearly two-to-one margin in the Republican primary and went on to win 60.4 percent in the general election against a Democrat and a Libertarian. This time, Guzman is on the Republican ballot with Pool and no other challengers. She, like just about every judge in Texas who hasn’t been in enough trouble to get attention, is virtually unknown. Pool is unknown, too, unless you’re old enough to remember his father, the late congressman from North Texas, or you know about the Dallas-are lake named after Joe Pool Sr. Guzman has virtually all of the institutional support....
State v. Naylor — A Debate among Conservatives on the Texas Supreme Court

State v. Naylor — A Debate among Conservatives on the Texas Supreme Court

by SCOTT A. BRISTER & DALE WAINWRIGHT February 1, 2016 Some judicial decisions — those covered on the front pages of newspapers and discussed on TV — are eagerly awaited by millions. But most cases do not involve hot-button issues that generate mass interest; typically, they concern matters so technical or arcane that no one beyond the immediate parties and legal specialists ever read them. Spicy or bland, however, every case is equally subject to certain iron rules — in particular, the rule that procedural and jurisdictional barriers often determine whether a court can decide the case at all. Failing to understand these threshold jurisdictional questions under the constitution can generate wildly misleading assessments of decisions that turn on jurisdiction rather than the merits of the question before the court. One current example is the Texas Supreme Court’s decision last June in State v. Naylor, a same-sex marriage case. Or at least, it would have been about same-sex marriage, if the court had had jurisdiction to decide the case. In the opening paragraph of the Naylor opinion, the court set forth the issue before it, stating that is must determine whether the “State lacks standing to appeal the judgment.” On a 5–3 vote, the justices — all eight judicial conservatives, all eight Republicans — held that they could not reach the merits. Why? The state was the only party that appealed, and the court’s majority held that the state lacked legal standing, a necessary component of jurisdiction, because under established rules of court procedure the state had sought to intervene in the case too late. We express no opinion...

Rick Green Announces Run for Supreme Court, Challenging Justice Paul Green

Editor’s note/disclosure:  Former Representative Rick Green is challenging incumbent Justice Paul Green in the Republican primary. Justice Paul Green (R) has served on the Court since 2004, and has been endorsed by Texas Civil Justice League PAC. Friends and Fellow Patriots, For months I’ve been approached by conservative leaders across Texas and asked to consider running for Texas Supreme Court. Honestly, I wasn’t very excited about it at first. I have a fantastic job and my family is loving the opportunity we have to live out the liberty that we are given. My family has been blessed with opportunities to travel across the country and teach Americans about the Constitution and our founding fathers. It doesn’t get much better than that. But as the calls continued, my children started reminding me of the principle I have taught them: that every generation is in desperate need of leaders willing to sacrifice convenience for the sake of liberty. Today we have a Supreme Court, both nationally and at times in Texas, which has ignored the rule of law, has trampled on marriage and has refused to stand for the very freedom upon which our nation was founded. The deliberate violation of separation of powers is a threat to the liberty we all cherish. It’s time to put a constitutional watchdog on the Supreme Court. I am answering the call today with my family by my side, excited about the challenge and opportunity ahead. I NEED your support. Will you consider endorsing our campaign today? The grassroots have risen up across our state and elected strong conservative leaders like Ted Cruz and Dan Patrick, we must continue...