Register Now: TCJL Judicial Primary Candidate Forum 1-30-18

Register Now: TCJL Judicial Primary Candidate Forum 1-30-18

Register Now: TCJL Judicial Primary Candidate Forum 1-30-18 Register Now You are Cordially Invited to the Texas Civil Justice League 2018 Judicial Primary Candidate Forum featuring 2018 primary candidates and incumbents for: TEXAS SUPREME COURT & TEXAS COURTS OF APPEALS   Featuring Special Guest The Honorable Harriet O’Neill Former Justice, Texas Supreme Court Monday, January 30, 2018 10AM – 3PM Moody Bank Tower Auditorium 400 W. 15th Street, 3rd Floor Austin, Texas 78701 Attendance and lunch complimentary for TCJL members Cost for non-members is $25 If you would like to suggest questions to be considered for submission to the judges/candidates, please send your suggestions to carol@tcjl.com and lisa@daviskaufman.com Register Now Want new articles directly to your inbox? Subscribe to our Publishing Service. E-mail Address First Name 10 + 12 =...
Governor Abbott Taps Jimmy Blacklock for Texas Supreme Court

Governor Abbott Taps Jimmy Blacklock for Texas Supreme Court

Pending the confirmation of Justice Don Willett for the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, Governor Greg Abbott has selected Jimmy Blacklock as the next Associate Justice of the Texas Supreme Court. Blacklock currently serves as the Governor’s General Counsel. A graduate of Rice University and the University of Texas School of Law, he previously worked for then-Attorney General Abbott in the Solicitor General’s office and as an assistant attorney general. “We applaud Governor Abbott for making a superb choice for the Texas Supreme Court,” said Carol Sims, TCJL Executive Director. “Jimmy Blacklock has broad legal experience in state government and will bring a unique and scholarly perspective to the Court. He also understands the critical importance of judicial restraint, deference to legislative policy decisions, and a stable jurisprudence to the continuing prosperity of our state.” Justice Willett’s confirmation could come as early as next month. The timing of Governor Abbott’s announcement, just two weeks before the December 11 filing deadline for the 2018 primary ballot, appears to head off the possibility of a contested primary or the prospect of Justice Willett’s replacement on the ballot by vote of the State Republican Executive Committee. This process may still occur if Justice Willett’s confirmation does not occur until after December 11, but it seems highly unlikely that, if called to do so, the SREC would put anyone other than the Governor’s appointee on the ballot. As the Governor’s appointee, Blacklock will run for election to a full six-year term in...
Former Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Jack Pope dies at 103

Former Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Jack Pope dies at 103

Jack Pope 1913-2017 from Osler McCarthy on Vimeo. Retired Texas Chief Justice Jack Pope, who helped establish formal judicial education for Texas judges, fought for a voluntary judicial-ethics code when judges had none and fought again to make that code mandatory and enforceable, died Saturday at 103. He served Texas for 38 years as a district court judge, court of appeals justice and on the Supreme Court, the last two as chief justice. His judicial tenure, as a whole, was the longest of any Texas Supreme Court justice. “Chief Justice Jack Pope was a judicial icon,” Chief Justice Nathan L. Hecht said. “His hard work, scholarship, common sense, humor, and integrity are legendary. No Texas judge has ever been more committed to serving the rule of law and the cause of justice. He was my mentor, role model, counselor, and most especially, my friend. Texas has lost a great, great man.” As a court of appeals justice, Pope’s reassessment of water rights conveyed by Spanish and Mexican land grants changed Texas water law forever. As chief justice he forged a way to guarantee income to finance legal assistance for the poor. Concerned with double litigation in the same case, he won legislative support for statutory changes to thwart “forum shopping” for favorable judges. “I’m a common-law lawyer,” he proudly would proclaim, his right hand jabbing at the air, his voice emphatic in the way Jack Pope’s could get emphatic when his passions ran high about the law and judging. “And I was a common-law judge.” The common law is the wisdom tested by the ages, he believed, but for...
Judge refuses to unseal Russell Budd deposition, testimony linked to Baron & Budd asbestos memo

Judge refuses to unseal Russell Budd deposition, testimony linked to Baron & Budd asbestos memo

Source: SETexasRecord Author: David Yates, Jan 31, 6:21 PM AUSTIN – A documentary filmmaker seeking to obtain the deposition of one of Texas’ most well-known plaintiff’s attorneys was shut down by a district judge Tuesday, as the court refused to unseal testimony linked to an asbestos memo that has been the subject of much controversy for the past two decades.  In November, freelance journalist Christine Biederman intervened in a 24-year old asbestos suit filed in Travis County, seeking to unseal the deposition of trial lawyer Russell Budd, president of Baron & Budd — a Dallas-based law firm specializing in toxic torts. While the Baron & Budd case has been cleared off the court’s docket for more than a decade, Biederman believes Budd’s deposition, which is presumably centered on the “Terrell memo,” has relevancy to current asbestos litigation and would eventually play a role in the documentary she is helping to produce. The Terrell memo, considered by some to be a “cheat sheet,” purportedly reveals how Baron & Budd attorneys coached up clients on how to identify asbestos products and exposures that they might not actually remember and might never have been exposed to in the first place. Those seeking to produce the asbestos litigation documentary sought to videotape the hearing to unseal. However, Budd’s counsel objected and the judge refused to allow media to use any digital recording methods. Much of the hearing centered on whether the deposition was an actual court record and properly sealed under Rule 76a of the Texas Rules of Civil Procedure. The rule states that a document may be sealed if the substantial interest...