2018

2018
(Best Viewed in Landscape Mode)

Texas Supreme Court, Place 2




Steven Kirkland
(Democrat)




Jimmy Blacklock*
(Republican)



SOCIAL

Website | Facebook | Twitter


Website | Facebook | Twitter



CAMPAIGN CONTACT

Steven Kirkland Campaign
P.O. Box 2752
Houston, Texas 77252
(832) 779-0118
Email


Jimmy Blacklock Campaign
P.O. Box 1588
Austin, Texas 78767
Email



CURRENT OCCUPATION

Judge, 334th District Court
Harris County


Justice, Texas Supreme Court
Place 2



UNDERGRAD SCHOOL/YEAR

B.A. History
Rice University
1992


B.A. History
University of Texas at Austin
2002



JURIS DOCTOR

University of Houston Law Center
cum laude
1990


Yale Law School
2005
President, Yale Law Republicans



YEAR STATE BAR LICENSURE

1990


2005



JUDICIAL EXPERIENCE - APPELLATE




Justice, Texas Supreme Court
Place 2
January 2017 to present



JUDICIAL EXPERIENCE - OTHER

  • Judge, 334th Civil District Court (2017-present)
  • Senior Assistant City Attorney - Houston (2013-16)
  • Judge, 215th District Court (2009-2012); first openly gay Harris County civil district judge in Harris County
  • Municipal Judge, City of Houston (2001-08)





LEGAL EXPERIENCE - NONJUDICIAL

  • Principal, Law Office of Steven Kirkland (1998-2001)
  • Senior Attorney, Texaco (1986-98)

  • General Counsel, Governor of Texas (2017)
  • Deputy Attorney General for Legal Counsel, Texas Attorney General (2012-2017)
  • Special Assistant & Senior Counsel, Texas Attorney General (2010-2012)
  • Assistant Solicitor General, Texas Attorney General (2009-2010)
  • Counsel to the Assistant Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice (2008-2009)
  • Attorney, Vinson and Elkins (2006-09)
  • Deputy Attorney General, Texas
  • Law Clerk, Judge Jerry E. Smith, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit (2005-06)


BOARD CERTIFICATIONS

None sought


None sought



COURTS ADMITTED TO




  • U.S. Supreme Court
  • U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals
  • U.S. District Court, Northern District of Texas
  • U.S. District Court, Southern District of Texas
  • U.S. District Court, Western District of Texas


HONORS & AWARDS

  • Harris County Democratic Party Trailblazer Award (2011)
  • Houston GLBT Political Caucus Leadership Award (2009)
  • Judge Norman Black Award, State Bar of Texas, Sexual Orientation Gender Identity Issues Section (2009)
  • Harvey Milk Award, Houston Stonewall Young Democrats (2008)
  • Government Friend of the Homeless Award, Coalition for the Homeless of Houston & Harris Co. (2006)
  • Greater Houston Preservation Alliance's Good Brick Award for Neighborhood Revitalization - 1996
  • AmJur Award, Antitrust (1988)
  • Who’s Who in American Colleges and Universities (1982)
  • Baker College Fellow (1982)
  • Philpott Award for Exceptional Service to Baker College (1982)





PRIOR ELECTION RESULTS

2018 Texas Democratic Primary
Texas Supreme Court, Place 2
100%; unopposed

2016 Texas General Election
District Judge, 334th District Court
52.09% v. Grant Dorfman (R)

2012 Texas Democratic Primary
District Judge, 215th Judicial District
38.50% v. Elaine H. Palmer (D)

2008 Texas Democratic Primary
District Judge, 215th Civil Judicial District Court
51.31% v. Levi J. Benton* (R)


2018 Texas Republican Primary
Texas Supreme Court, Place 2
100%; unopposed



MOST RECENT BAR POLL RESULTS

2,500 of 4,321 votes
57.86%


1,821 of 4,321 votes
42.14%



KEY ENDORSEMENTS

  • Numerous state senators including Sylvia Garcia, Borris Miles, John Whitmire, State Senator
  • Numerous state representatives including Alma Allen, Carol Alvarado, Garnet Coleman, Jessica Farrar, Mary Gonzalez, Ana Hernandez, Celia Israel, Armando “Mando” Martinez, Sergio Munoz, Armando Walle & Gene Wu
  • Rodney Ellis, Harris County Commissioner
  • Ramon Garcia, Hidalgo County Judge
  • Sheriff Eddie Guerra, Hidalgo County Sheriff
  • Annise Parker, former Houston Mayor

  • Governor Greg Abbott
  • Texas Leadership Institute for Public Advocacy
  • Texas Civil Justice League PAC
  • Texas Home School Coalition Association


JUDICIAL PHILOSOPHY




Jimmy’s approach to being a judge—his judicial philosophy—is firmly grounded in the text of the Texas Constitution. Our Constitution’s very first words are the best place to start:

“Humbly invoking the blessings of Almighty God, the people of the State of Texas, do ordain and establish this Constitution.” – Preamble, Texas Constitution

Before it says anything else, our Constitution humbly asks for the blessings of Almighty God. After acknowledging our need for God’s blessing, the preamble makes clear that the People of Texas have established their own government. The People are not ruled by the government, and we are certainly not ruled by judges. Instead, the People use laws to rule over their government, including the courts. In other words, the courts of Texas do not belong to the judges or the lawyers. The courts belong to the People.

This revolutionary idea of rule by the People—known as popular sovereignty—was pioneered by the founders of our great Nation, who established the United States in the name of “We the People.” The Texas Constitution contains an excellent statement of this fundamental principle of our system of government:

“All political power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on their authority, and instituted for their benefit. The faith of the people of Texas stands pledged to the preservation of a republican form of government, and, subject to this limitation only, they have at all times the inalienable right to alter, reform or abolish their government in such manner as they may think expedient.” –Article I, Section 2, Texas Constitution.

Because the courts were established by the People and belong to the People, the proper role of courts is to faithfully apply the People’s laws—and nothing more. We are a State ruled by laws, not by men. As Alexander Hamilton recognized in Federalist No. 78, the role of courts is to apply the will of the People, not to impose the will of judges. That is because the People have consented to be governed by our Constitution and by the laws enacted through the legislative process established in our Constitution. We have not consented to be governed by what judges think is best for us, or by a “living constitution” that changes any time enough judges decide it should change.

“The judiciary, on the contrary, has no influence over either the sword or the purse; no direction either of the strength or of the wealth of the society; and can take no active resolution whatever. It may truly be said to have neither FORCE nor WILL, but merely judgment.” — Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 78

Guided by the text of the Constitution, judges must work hard to apply the People’s laws accurately and impartially. Judges must also vigorously defend the unalienable constitutional rights guaranteed to the People by our founding documents—rights like the freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and the right to keep and bear arms. As a Justice on the Texas Supreme Court, Jimmy Blacklock will always strive to put the People of Texas and our Constitution first. He will never exceed the limited role assigned to the judiciary by our Constitution. And he will never waver in his dedication to uphold the rights guaranteed by our Constitution.
Source


OTHER INFORMATION

  • First in family to graduate college
  • Worked his way through law school as a paralegal at Texaco
  • Co-founder, Avenue Community Development Corporation; restored more than 350 units of affordable housing





INFORMATION APPROVED BY CANDIDATE ON:

Sourced from public information


Sourced from public information



Last Updated:

10/3/2018


10/3/2018


Information gathered from various public sources, and may not yet be approved by the candidate.
Please send any corrections to info@tcjl.com

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