Donald Trump unveils list of his top picks for Supreme Court

Donald Trump unveils list of his top picks for Supreme Court

 WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee for president, released Wednesday a list of 11 potential Supreme Court justices he plans to vet to fill the seat of late Justice Antonin Scalia if he’s elected to the White House. The list of conservative federal and state judges includes Steven Colloton of Iowa, Allison Eid of Colorado and Raymond Gruender of Missouri. Also on the list are: Thomas Hardiman of Pennsylvania, Raymond Kethledge of Michigan, Joan Larsen of Michigan, Thomas Lee of Utah, William Pryor of Alabama, David Stras of Minnesota, Diane Sykes of Wisconsin and Don Willett of Texas. Trump had previously named Pryor and Sykes as examples of kind of justices he would choose. The news comes as Trump is working to bring together a fractured Republican Party and earn the trust of still-skeptical establishment Republicans who question his electability in the general election, as well as conservatives in his party still wary of his commitment to their cause. In a statement, Trump said the list “is representative of the kind of constitutional principles I value” and said that, as president, he would use it “as a guide to nominate our next United States Supreme Court Justices.” His campaign stressed the list was compiled “first and foremost, based on constitutional principles, with input from highly respected conservatives and Republican Party leadership.” Larsen, who serves on the Michigan Supreme Court and is a former law clerk to Scalia, delivered one of the tributes to the late justice at his memorial service in March. She served in the Justice Department office that produced the legal justifications for the...
Governor Abbott Appoints Tidwell to 6th Judicial District Court

Governor Abbott Appoints Tidwell to 6th Judicial District Court

Governor Greg Abbott has appointed Wes Tidwell of Paris as judge of the 6th Judicial District Court in Lamar and Red River Counties for a term set to expire at the next general election in November 2016. Wes Tidwell is managing partner of Ellis & Tidwell, LLP. He is a member of the State Bar of Texas, Fifth Circuit Bar Association, Texas Bar Foundation and the Northeast Texas Bar Association and member and past president of the Lamar County Bar Association. Additionally, he is a board member of the Red River Valley Boys and Girls Club and a youth baseball coach for the Paris Breakfast Optimist. Tidwell received a Bachelor of Science from Texas A&M University-Commerce and a Juris Doctor from the University of Tulsa School of Law. April 7,...
Governor Abbott Appoints Maginnis to 435th Judicial District Court

Governor Abbott Appoints Maginnis to 435th Judicial District Court

Governor Greg Abbott has appointed Patty Maginnis of Conroe as judge of the 435th Judicial District Court in Montgomery County for a term set to expire at the next general election in November 2016. Patty Maginnis is a partner at Maginnis, Pullan & Young and previously served as an assistant district attorney for Montgomery County. She is a member of the State Bar of Texas, Montgomery County Bar Association and Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association. She is a board member of a parent teacher organization in the Conroe Independent School District. Maginnis received a Bachelor of Arts from Brenau Women’s College and a Juris Doctor from South Texas College of...
Governor Abbott Appoints Larson Judge of 395th Judicial District

Governor Abbott Appoints Larson Judge of 395th Judicial District

Governor Greg Abbott has appointed Ryan Larson of Hutto as judge of the 395th Judicial District Court in Williamson County for a term set to expire at the next general election in November 2016. Ryan Larson is the head administrative law judge at the Railroad Commission of Texas and previously served as an assistant attorney general in the Texas Attorney General’s Office. He is a fellow of the Texas Bar Foundation and a member of the State Bar of Texas, State Bar of California, The Federalist Society, Williamson County Bar Association and the Austin Bar Association. Additionally, he is a Bible school teacher at Hyde Park Baptist Church (The Quarries Church), past president of the Lookout at Brushy Creek Homeowner Association and a past volunteer of the Round Rock Area Serving Center. Larson received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, Los Angeles and a Juris Doctor from Southwestern Law...

What’s in a name? Texas Supreme Court Races

by MARK PULLIAM January 4, 2016 1:41 PM Trial lawyers make a cynical play for the Texas Supreme Court, Place 9 This is another post on the races currently underway for three seats on the Texas Supreme Court. I have previously written about the race between incumbent Justice Debra Lehrmann and challenger Justice Michael Massengale for Place 3, and the potentially confusing race between incumbent Justice Paul W. Green and challenger Rick Green for Place 5. In this post I discuss the race between incumbent Justice Eva Guzman and challenger Joe Pool Jr. for Place 9. Why am I writing about this? First of all, I am a (retired) lawyer and legal blogger living in Texas, and the composition of the state supreme court — although sometimes overlooked — is very important to all Texans. Second, thanks to landmark tort-reform legislation passed in 2003, Texas’s legal system is widely regarded as the most business-friendly in the United States, a welcome respite from the rampant plaintiff-orientation so common elsewhere. Texas’s legal system, including its judiciary, is a national model. Third, elections in Texas have national implications. Texas is the nation’s most populous and consequential Red state: All statewide elected officials (including both U.S. senators) are Republican; both chambers of the state legislature are controlled by lopsided GOP majorities; and, due to its 38 electoral votes (second greatest of any state, trailing only California), Texas is an influential player in presidential politics. Home of Bush 41 and Bush 43, Texas boasts recent (former governor Rick Perry) and current (Senator Ted Cruz) presidential candidates. Unlike Las Vegas, what happens in Texas doesn’t...